Eric Lefkofsky Fills the Gap in the Data-Centric Approach to Cancer

So as to treat cancer successfully, doctors require data. But they do not need data about just a few things. In today’s medical research system, the inability to gather data about several things is missing, and this is making it difficult to treat this disease, Erich Lefkofsky, the co-founder and CEO of Tempus, said on Wednesday at the Fortune Brainstorm Health conference in San Diego.

While there is sufficient patient data out there, lack of sources that combine therapeutic data with genomic information is a major problem in the health care industry. Mr. Leftkofsky noted that other than molecular data, doctors need clinical data to be able to fight cancer efficiently. He explained that clinicians need to know which treatments their patients are on and how they are responding instead of only gathering data about their DNA and RNA makeup.

If a clinical researcher is observing several cancer patients taking Herceptin, he needs to get to know why it is working on 40 percent and not 60 percent of these participants. Moreover, the researchers should know what other things are going on with the patients who are not responding positively to the treatment. For example, are they diabetic? Or, are they taking other drugs?

About Eric Lefkofsky

Eric Lefkofsky, a philanthropist who has founded several organizations including Groupon (GRPN), Uptake Technologies, and Lightbank, was inspired to create a platform where doctors can collect adequate data for analysis when his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. He began to reflect on how truck drivers often get valuable data on how to do their job as he sat in clinics with his wife. This realization motivated him to start an organization with a mission to establish databases and advance the treatment of cancer and named it Tempus.

Other than health, art and culture is another area of the Lefkofskys’ philanthropy. The family’s largest contribution to a single organization to date is seven million U.S. dollars, which they donated to the Steppenwolf Theatre Company. The Lefkofskys’ other major contributions to arts and culture include the $2.5 million to Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art and the $ 1.5 million to the Art Institute of Chicago.

Twitter: Twitter.com/lefkofsky

The Dedicated Breast Cancer Fighter, Erick Lefkofsky

The fight against cancer in the present day has intensified. Despite the fact that no cure has been discovered yet, scientists and researchers do not relent. They are still waging war against it in all possible ways. Mr Eric Lefkofsky has joined in the fight and is providing data that will assist in the better treatment of breast cancer.

Eric Lefkofsky is the founder of Tempus. It is a startup cancer-fighting enterprise from Groupon. It aims at providing doctors at the University of Chicago crucial data that will aid in the better administration of treatment to breast cancer patients. The organization has joined forces with the University of Chicago to provide molecular sequencing and analysis for their breast cancer specialists. It has, therefore, created personalized treatment plans for patients from this analysis. It has purposed to analyze data from as many breast cancer patients to help practitioners expose patterns that forecast how patients will respond to treatment. Click here to know more.

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer. Unfortunately, petite data on the patients is available. It has made the formulation of therapy a hectic task for physicians due to lack of reference points. Therefore, provision of this data is the aim of Tempus as it will help lead to better treatment and to ultimately improved patient outcomes. Hence, it utilizes the services of machines learning and genomic sequencing to assist doctors in making immediate personalized treatment decisions.

Erick Lefkofsky has heavily invested in the healthcare sector. He is a founding partner of Lightbank as well as co-founder and Chairman of Groupon. Moreover, he has served in other organizations like Mediaocean, Echo Global Logistics, and InnerWorking. Also, he has established the Lefkofsky Family Foundation, a private charitable organization. He is a graduate of Michigan University. Eric’s aim is to live in a breast cancer-free society.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America Teams Up For New Cancer Course of Action

Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) has partnered with NantHealth and Allscripts to put a more personalized system into action that will design custom treatments specific to cancer patients.

The program, called Clinical Pathways, joins together the latest existing cancer research and passes on all pertinent treatment choices. The three started planning the custom result, called eviti, early last year.

According to Wikipedia, CTCA’s Southeastern Regional Medical Center’s Dr. George Daneker said in a statement the collaboration does away with potential speculation by clinicians and provides healing options to patients.

For example, Clinical Pathways will compare treatment alternatives, make access available to up-to-date guidelines as well as provide real-time usefulness. The program will inform all involved of the process without disrupting the flow of information.

By utilizing the program physicians are able to recover facts and statistics from an impartial medical library which takes in more than 2,700 cancer treatment routines. A team of oncologists, oncology nurses as well as an advisory board keeps the library current.

Bobby Reddy, NantHealth senior executive director of medical affairs, said the combined technology which resulted from Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s Clinical Pathways, Allscripts Sunrise EHR and NantHealth’s eviti is proving to be a pivotal moment for the treatment of cancer.

Richard Stephenson, founder and chairman of CTCA, started the centers following the death of his mother from cancer. He became aware of the lack of compassionate and resourceful treatment and made the decision to transform cancer care in her memory.

CTCA’s unique approach combines testing, radiation, chemotherapy and more with supporting therapies that lend a hand to patients before and after treatment.

With its headquarters in Boca Raton, Florida CTCA is a national network of five hospitals that work with adult cancer patients. Facilities are available in Atlanta, Chicago, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Tulsa. Worldwide CTCA offers patients in Mexico City, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean cancer treatment assistance at any of the US centers.

For more information on CTCA follow them on Facebook.

Clay Siegall’s Tireless Quest To Meet Cancer Patients Unmet Needs

As head of Seattle Genetics since 2002, Clay Siegall is proud that the company was the first to receive FDA approval for an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), which is marketed under the brand name ADCETRIS. Used to treat Hodgkin Lymphoma patients who have not responded to chemotherapy, ADCETRIS’s antibody targets lymphoma cells and then delivers an anticancer drug. Siegall has said that Seattle Genetics is working to gain FDA approval to widen ADCETRIS’s use, which combined with the company’s plans to augment its drug pipeline, interests investors. Under Siegall’s leadership, Seattle Genetics’ stock price has nearly tripled in the last five years.

A frequent featured speaker at industry events, Siegall impresses audiences with his dedication to improving therapies for cancer patients. One of his responsibilities as CEO is to raise capital for Seattle Genetics to continue their research, an area that Siegall excels in. Bringing in more than $350 million from licensing agreements alone, Siegall ensures that Seattle Genetics will continue to develop breakthrough therapies that will benefit cancer patients.

With a dozen new drugs in development, Siegall is focusing on increasing the therapies available for cancer patients, which has been his goal since he co-founded Seattle Genetics in 1998. Xconomy reports that Siegall, in addition to running an ambitious biotechnology company, is on the Board of Governors of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Business Alliance and on the Board of Directors of the Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association. Also serving on the Boards of Directors for three private biotechnology companies, Siegall is extremely busy; nevertheless, he told Seeking Alpha “We think we can be the next big important biotech company.” This means Seattle Genetics would need to develop drug after drug, however, when it comes to new ways to meet cancer patients unmet needs, Siegall does not rest.